matt_au

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matt_au last won the day on March 11

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About matt_au

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  1. Plenty of good stuff in here already, but here are my two cents, from the perspective of someone who's not talented at games and is too lazy to 'train' properly, but nevertheless got heavily into Warsow/Quake/Reflex, and became an enthusiastic mid-tier dueler. (It probably seems rather self-obsessed, but the reason for talking about myself so much is that mine is the only path to loving the game that I can talk about with any real understanding.) - early on, what got me into Quake 3 was how fun it was to play badly, either on a small LAN with friends (and bots) or alone against bots. I didn't know strafejumping existed, paid no attention to armours, probably didn't even realise the powerups were predictably timed, but just had a blast walking around shooting. Obviously part of that was my young age and the relative novelty of any FPS game to me at the time, let alone one that I could play against my friends, but it also had a lot to do with the game itself. I'm not a game designer or a genius so I'm not sure exactly why Q3 grabbed me in that way, but there was something to it that didn't depend on any of the depth that I discovered later on. One thing that I know was important, and which I've mentioned before, was the structured single-player component. It was very simple, but it gave me some specific challenges to take on and a way to measure my progress from complete noob to slightly less of a noob. - at some point I very briefly tried CPM, but found it confusing and didn't give it a serious go. - much later I discovered Warsow, which is where I really got into the meat of the Quake experience. (But I think I was predisposed to give it a go, and to enjoy it, because of my positive feelings about Q3.) The first thing that grabbed me was the movement: I could see what was possible from watching other players in-game and on Youtube, and got a little taste of it myself thanks to Warsow's newb-friendly (but still incredibly hard to master) movement system. For a while I only really played DA (the A1v1 equivalent), and just had a great time rocketjumping off walls and gradually learning to strafejump. Duel wasn't fun for quite a while, and if it were the only active mode I think I probably would have given up. But eventually, having played the occasional duel in between games of DA and CA, I got a feel for the subtleties and realised how enjoyable the tactical struggle could be when combined with the movement & shooting I already loved. From there I went to QL, CPM and Reflex, but discovering that I enjoyed Warsow duel was the point at which I really got hooked. Having an active community was important, but it didn't need to be huge -- just a few friendly people to help me get started, one or two regular duel partners at around my level, and some better players to look up to and measure my progress against. I'm not sure exactly what the lesson is from my experience -- perhaps something about the elements that attracted me as a newbie being quite different from, but not incompatible with, those that kept me interested -- but I thought this might at least provide a counter-example to the suggestion that games like Reflex aren't 'fun' and are only really suited to people who are motivated to put in hours of practice and take the game quite seriously. Of course I have some competitive spirit, but I've only really learned by playing, and played because I enjoyed it. I never got very good, but good enough to appreciate some of the subtleties of the game and to enjoy competing against some decent players. (And, perhaps most importantly in the context of this thread, to play a lot and become reasonably active within the community.) edit: one thing that I forgot to mention is that immediately before discovering Warsow, I'd been pretty heavily into TF2, but eventually got fed up with some of the bullshit surrounding it (this was around the time it transitioned from being a game people played because it was intrinsically fun to a glorified skinner box), as well as the feeling that the gameplay itself was fairly restrictive. Two of the great things about Warsow (and other Quakelikes) was their purity (no unlocks -- which still pretty much holds for Reflex since they're all purely cosmetic -- or other shortcuts to addiction, no critical hits, no attempt to hide skill disparities, and so on) & the freedom (of movement, of play style, to exploit their nuances rather than having everything locked down with speed caps and invisible walls, etc.) that they allowed.
  2. Definitely interested, whether I'd play or not would depend on the timing. I'm in platinum on the 1v1 ladder.
  3. They seemed good tonight, thanks. During map picking we couldn't see which maps we were voting on, but I'm guessing that's a broader problem unrelated to the game servers, because I also didn't have access to any of my custom items, & the 'player receives x competitive points' messages instead read 'player receives x item730' or something like that. Gameplay was lag-free as far as I noticed.
  4. Awesome, thanks -- I'll let you know next time I play (probably tonight or tomorrow).
  5. We seem to be copping it in Australia now too -- not disconnects but bad lag affecting both players.
  6. The QL/Reflex comparison is analogous to like, CS/CoD or tennis/squash or something. They're similar in some obvious (and important) ways, but different enough that you could easily enjoy one and be bored or frustrated by the other. Same with Warsow, really -- again there are plenty of similarities but the gameplay is actually different in a lot of important ways. The game Reflex really resembles closely is the Quake 3 mod CPM, but as well as a lot of smallish gameplay differences, Reflex has matchmaking & ladders, nicer graphics, a UI that won't scare away everyone born after 1990, in-game multi-player map editing, and so on.
  7. Oh I didn't mean creating a bunch of new maps or anything like that -- just taking existing maps and setting up a 'campaign' made up of ffa matches and a few duels (and other gamemodes if the bots are up to it). The gameplay would be identical to the matches you can set up yourself against bots right now, there would just be a developer-defined sequence of map/opponent combinations to play through in order.
  8. Just wondering if there are any plans for a Quake 3-style singleplayer mode? i.e. a series of bot matches to work your way through, with specific bots to defeat on specific maps, generally getting harder as you go, but with an adjustable difficulty level (and the game would keep track of the highest difficulty level you'd won each match on). I know everything in game development is a lot harder and more time consuming than I'd naively think, but I feel like even a really barebones version of this would be a great feature. (As a newcomer to arena shooters I loved the Q3 singleplayer, and it kept me playing and having fun for ages -- whereas even if I'd had decent internet I might have found the multiplayer pretty tough to get into.)
  9. Kind of like the Warsow (v) chats, but your opponent can't turn them off? Sign me up! (Not actually sarcastic. (v) Yeehaa!)
  10. edit: looks like this was affecting everyone, and apparently the bug has been found!
  11. ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Well done guys! Can't wait to play later today. BTW, DDK is streaming at the moment: https://www.twitch.tv/ddktv
  12. Release day!! Let's all meet on the servers this evening -- or is the release some time on the 8th in US/Euro timezones? ?
  13. Congratulations guys! I took a longish break after getting stressed out by some community-related stuff, but I'm looking forward to getting stuck in again. I hope anyone else who loves the game but hasn't been playing recently does the same thing -- let's make the 1.0 launch as big and as welcoming as possible! P.S. In that picture the top of the wrench looks like a dinosaur head (in a good way).
  14. map

    I miss the lower stair jump more often than I make it, but this upper one is pretty easy once you know what to do. Just wallrun along the left wall, jump at the right time so that you step up to the top of the stairs, then quickly circle jump left. Because the wallrun and the circle jump are in the same direction, you can hold W+A the whole time.
  15. Welcome! I'm in a bit of a hurry so apologies if this post doesn't make much sense. I saw from your other post that you're Australian -- the Aussie players are generally pretty friendly, so if you tell people in-game or in Discord that you're new and would like advice, there's a good chance you'll get a positive response. I recommend watching the videos in the 'learn' tab in-game, especially this series: I think the most important thing early on is to learn how the movement works (see the second video in the series above), then jump in and practice it -- either on dedicated movement maps, or just by focusing on it while playing against other people. Most things you can pick up as you go, but if you start playing with no idea of how to move I think you'll get frustrated pretty quickly -- whereas once you know what you're trying to do, learning the movement can be really satisfying. Also, 1v1 can be a pretty frustrating mode to learn in against experienced players, so I recommend arranging games with fellow newbies. You can also join us in our semi-regular CTF nights (see the Australian Reflex Discord (https://discord.gg/0bCvS7Ldv1UiF983) and the Steam group (https://steamcommunity.com/groups/aureflex) for details). This (http://www.reflexfps.net.au/newbies-guide-to-reflex/) is out of date and wasn't particularly good in the first place, but it might still have some useful information.